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what we do

grooming

Got Questions?

Actually, let us come clean.
("grooming"... "clean"... get it?  )

We do not have our own groomer in-house. We do, however, have good relationships with preferred third-party groomers.

We can make the necessary arrangements for your dog or cat to get a full grooming session with your preferred groomer or ours, including Collection & Delivery to/from that groomer's shop (although please do note that there will be additional charges for transport).

This said, all dogs and cats which stay with us for boarding always go home to you groomed, or what we call "lightly groomed", including being bathed when necessary; properly brushed and dematted; having nails checked and, if needed and with your permission, clipped; teeth check (see more on this below); and ears regularly cleaned. They even go home with their laundry done.

In fact, every single day we carefully and rather thoroughly check over all the pets in our care, including your birds, rabbits and all other critters, making sure they're clean, healthy and comfortable...
a-a-a-a-l-l-l-l over.

So rest easy. And if you would indeed like to go that one step further for your dog or cat by having us arrange a full grooming session with a local groomer, well that can happen too.

Taking "one step further" just one more step further ~ Your Pet's Teeth

 

If you would like your dog's or cat's teeth given a brush while they're with us (yes, read that again ~ we're serious), just let us know. The latest pricing for this is in our Price List (where else would it be?).

But it doesn't stop there (oh my goodness! when will the fun end?!):

We also offer a 10% discount on DKC Veterinary Clinic's standard full veterinary dentals if arranged for during your pet's boarding stay with DKC.

Now, the cynical among you will probably think we're just trying to drum up business for our veterinary clinic (who needs a dental cleaning for a pet?!). Well, you'd be right!

And wrong. Try to trust us when we tell you that dogs and cats (and some other pets too) really do need their teeth properly checked and cleaned by a vet, usually once a year. Chronic bad breath, rotting teeth, sore and bleeding gums... and more/worse are on the cards for many of your lil' darlin's if you rely only on pet food (usually dry kibbles) and toys to keep their mouths in shape. So in addition to brazenly manipulating you, we're actually trying to do our little something towards promoting preventive dental care. Think about it.

 

 

Clipping my pet's claws ~ How often should I do it?

Answer

When to clip your dog's claws depends on the amount of exercise your dog gets and, importantly, t

<h3>Clipping my pet's claws ~ How often should I do it?</h3> <div class="faq_ans_img"><img src="https://www.dkc.ae/images/faqs/faq_66.jpg"></div> <div class="faq_ans_text"><p>When to clip your dog's claws depends on the amount of exercise your dog gets and, importantly, the type of surface your dog exercises on. If you can manage to get some walkies time on rougher surfaces (such as roads (but be safe!)), this will usually be sufficient to maintain those claws at a good length. (Oh, and by the way, a good part of puppy training should always include playing with their feet ~ this gets them used having their paws and claws touched, making it easier as they get older to clip those claws when necessary.)</p> <p>As for cats... well, they have retractable claws (very high-tech!), and so they keep them smooth by scratching on posts or (don't say it!!) your furniture... when they get their claws out! As for length, however, this usually requires a little hands-on maintenance on your part... or on the part of your vet... whichever of you has more confidence.&nbsp;<img alt="" src="/graphics/ic_wink.png" height="15" width="15" />&nbsp; (It's not too difficult, though, so why not ask for some training?)</p> <p>The amount to be cut off depends on the nail length and the length of the small blood vessel within the nail, all of which you need to learn a bit about and can ask any vet or a good kennels/cattery handler about, and then you're off and running.</p> <p>Oh, and by the way, don't forget to clip your bird's claws too!</p></div>

Teeth Brushing ~ Should I or Shouldn't I?

Answer

Teeth brushing!!? For pets!!?? Oh my goodness!! What is the world coming to?!

Well, that's

<h3>Teeth Brushing ~ Should I or Shouldn't I?</h3><p>Teeth brushing!!? For pets!!?? Oh my goodness!! What is the world coming to?!</p> <p>Well, that's probably too philosophical a question for us humble pet owners, so just know this: the less effort and time you put into your dog's or cat's teeth at home, the more likely you will face serious dental issues (and costs) in the future. Yep, it's a sad truth.</p> <p>Dental plaque and tartar build up on your dog's teeth just like it does with us humanoids, so brushing your pet's teeth once daily is best.</p> <p>Once daily!? Can you even <i>imagine</i> doing it this often?</p> <p>It <i>is</i> a lot of work, that's true. Furthermore, some dogs and cats <i>really</i> don't like having their teeth brushed (especially those chompers at the back), which of course will make the job all that more difficult and tiresome, for both of you. But if you get the right tools of the trade (at pretty much any pet shop) and keep at it, the difference will amaze you. Truly. And in fact, if you can't manage it every day, or even every week, then just do what you can whenever you can, because within reason, in this case, <i>something</i> is always better than <i>nothing</i>.</p> <p>This said, there are alternatives to brushing (yay!)... but they're not quite as good (boo!). Dental gels can be rubbed on the gums, and there are products which you can put in their drinking water to help reduce the bacterial load in the mouth. Do make sure that the product you buy is approved by the Veterinary Oral Health Council, as there are many on the market that do not do what they actually claim to do (what's new?) ~ ask your vet if you're not sure.</p> <p>Ultimately, if you notice bad breath on your pet or are in any way worried about their teeth, a quick veterinary check will let you know if you need to have your pet's teeth scaled and polished (just like you do when you go to the dental hygienist yourself) ~ most pets will need this done as they get older ~ usually yearly.</p> <p>So what's the point of home dental care if you gotta visit the vet anyway? Well, seriously, frequency of need and cost ~ and the comfort of your pet, of course. You'd be very surprised how many dogs and cats are not feeling as well as you might think, until you see the difference after they've been to the vet for a cleaning and, sometimes, extraction of rotting teeth and sore gums.</p> <p>Sorry folks, but that's the tooth.</p>

Is it safe to bring my pet into the heat of the UAE?

Answer
<h3>Is it safe to bring my pet into the heat of the UAE?</h3> <p>Yes it is safe. In fact, thousands of pets are imported into the UAE each year; the vast majority do perfectly well here, regardless of the breed.</p> <p>What about those which don't do well? Fundamentally, when things go wrong (such as dehydration and/or heatstroke), it is about how these pets are managed rather than their innate inability to cope with the heat or the fact of the heat being prohibitive. Yes, the UAE is VERY hot for at least 4 or 5 months of the year, and yes you must be careful about this during these periods, but isn't it extremely cold in January in Canada? Or hot in Texas in July? Aren't there any number of locations around the world with extreme temperatures at certain times of the year? And aren't there pets in these places too? Of course there are.</p> <p>You should be aware of the dangers of the heat here, but if you're thoughtful about this, you should be neither worried nor overly concerned. Do some research on the internet and talk to your UAE-based vet for guidance about things to watch out for, and at the most basic level be aware of such things as not&nbsp;leaving your dog or cat outside during the hottest periods of the year for too long, and always make sure there is plenty of water readily available, even if you're going for a walk.</p> <p>There is more to learn about this and plenty of information available from any number of sources. But yes, in short, it is safe to bring your pet.</p>

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